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Archive for August 2003

CASHING IN ON THE IMMIGRATION INDUSTRY

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The Express

BYLINE: By Cyril Dixon

FATHER and son Yuri and Anton Curtis and business partner Paul Callingham shared more than GBP 1.6million as their Roselodge firm enjoyed the asylum boom. Their Wembley-based outfit saw pre-tax profits almost double, from GBP 733,600 to GBP 1.3million, as it won contracts paid for by the taxpayer. Roselodge has become one of the biggest names in the refugee care market by running hostels and services such as training. In the firm’s last accounts filed at Companies House, covering the 12 months to March last year, turnover soared to GBP 26.6million from GBP 11.7million. They also show that the directors shared “emoluments” worth GBP 1.6million, compared to just GBP 315,500 the previous year. Shareholders were given dividends totalling GBP 320,000. Mr Curtis junior, aged 42 and the highest-paid director, saw his personal package increase four-fold, from GBP 159,000 to GBP 648,725. Last year, he and wife Bettina bought a GBP 1million house in London’s exclusive East Finchley suburb. His father, a 62-year-old Hungarian immigrant, lives with wife Katy in Highfield Gardens, a “millionaire’s row” address in Golders Green. Mr Callingham, 45, lives in a GBP 350,000 house in Maidenhead, Berks, with his wife Jackie, and daughters Phillipa and Charlotte. Brighton property developer Michael Holland, 56, made a fortune converting a seaside hotel into an asylum hostel. He packed the Adelphi Hotel in St Leonard’s, Sussex, with up to 200 Kosovans, Albanians, Iraqis and other Eastern Europeans. Since striking the deal three years ago, Mr Holland has paid himself an annual salary of up to GBP 280,000. HisĀ  company, Adelphi Hotels Ltd, saw turnover rise to GBP 22million in the 12 months to January last year, from nearly GBP 7million previously. Profits fell from GBP 424,000 to GBP 175,000: Mr Holland cut his pay from GBP 278,000 to GBP 104,426. Since dealing with NASS, Mr Holland has bought a new GBP 700,000 house in Brighton’s genteel Withdean Road area, with wife Nina. As head of the Angel Group property firm, Julia Davey, 46, enjoyed a share in the company’s GBP 1.2million share dividends. She found herself in the thick of residents’ protests about asylum centres her company has set up across Britain. At one home, Angel Heights, Newcastle upon Tyne, inmates rioted after having their pocket money cut. The company – which also runs tourist hotels – increased turnover from GBP 15.2million to GBP 21.6million in the 12 months to October last year. Pre-tax profits slipped from GBP 4.8 million to just over GBP 4million, but Ms Davey, who holds 100,000 shares and lives in London’s Docklands, increased total dividends from GBP 500,000 the year before. Businessmen Nurdin and Nick Jivraj saw profits of their firm Accommodata increase almost ten-fold in the last two years, and gave shareholders a GBP 790,000 dividend. But one of their previous companies folded with losses of GBP 100million. Company records say Nurdin, 70, and Nick, 43, live in a mansion block overlooking the Royal Albert Hall in Kensington, London. Essex millionaire Graham King, 36, moved into refugees from nightclubs, gaming firms, caravan parks and racehorses. He set up Clearspring Management to house migrants. He owns a GBP 350,000 house in Benfleet, Essex, and drives a silver Porsche, although his company reported a loss of just over GBP 500,000. Widow Ferial Sabbagh, 61, has been accused of putting asylum seekers into slum accommodation through her Landmark Liverpool firm. Three years ago, the Daily Express’ sister paper the Sunday Express revealed how up to 600 people were living in squalid conditions in twin tower blocks. She herself has a GBP 350,000 house in Acton, West London. When contacted by the Daily Express, none of the companies was prepared to explain how much they had earned from the taxpayer.

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Written by Concerned

August 25, 2003 at 11:09 am

Posted in Uncategorized